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Trescothick recognised for helping to raise mental health awareness


Former England cricketer Marcus Trescothick has been awarded the Making a Difference award at the Mind Mental Health Media Awards 2010 in recognition of his decision to write and speak publicly about his personal experience of depression. 

The awards by Britain’s leading mental health charity identify the most effective portrayals of mental distress and reporting of mental health in broadcast and new media.  The Making a Difference award is presented to someone who has made a genuine impact on the way that mental health is viewed.

Trescothick, who continues to play cricket as captain of Somerset, was recognised for his involvement with the BBC’s Inside Sport documentary investigating depression amongst sportsmen, and for his candid autobiography Coming Back To Me, detailing what it is like to live with the condition.

He retired from international cricket because of his illness but has made efforts to raise awareness of mental health problems in the media, helping bring mental health to the attention of sports fans.

Trescothick said: “It means so much to have won Mind’s Making a Difference award. One of the worst things about having a mental health problem is feeling that you are alone and so to be recognised for helping to raise awareness, which will hopefully help others going through the same thing not to feel so isolated, is just the best feeling.”

Mind chief executive Paul Farmer said: “Marcus's decision to speak publicly about his experience of depression brought mental health problems to the attention of a generation of young people. He is an excellent role model who is an inspiration for young men experiencing mental distress and his actions have no doubt helped many to come forward and seek help.”

Follow this link to buy Coming Back To Me: The Autobiography of Marcus Trescothick

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